How to Write a Second Follow-Up Email After an Interview

By Indeed Editorial Team

Published 31 May 2022

The Indeed Editorial Team comprises a diverse and talented team of writers, researchers and subject matter experts equipped with Indeed's data and insights to deliver useful tips to help guide your career journey.

Professionals often send a follow-up email to thank a hiring manager for their time after an interview, and they may send a second follow-up email if a hiring manager doesn't follow up for a long period. Second follow-up emails allow you to check on the status of your application while showing your enthusiasm about a role. Learning how to write one can help you encourage a hiring manager to follow up on your application. In this article, we explain how to write a second follow-up email after an interview, provide tips for writing one and share a template and example.

How to write a second follow-up email after an interview

Here are some steps you can take to write a second follow-up email after an interview that reiterates your interest in a job:

1. Enter relevant information in the subject line

The subject line of an email gives the reader a brief description of the contents of the email. Including relevant information tells the hiring manager what to expect when they read the email. It can also show them the email is genuine, so they know it's safe to open. Keep the subject of the email clear and concise. Here are some examples you can use when writing a second follow-up email:

  • Enquiring about position status

  • Following up regarding application

  • Question about application

  • Clarification on the hiring process

  • Hiring process advancement inquiry

Related: Follow-Up Email Examples for After the Interview

2. Open with a professional greeting

At the beginning of the email, greet the hiring manager by name. This makes the email more personal and can help you establish a connection with the hiring manager, which may encourage them to choose you for a job. Here are some examples of professional salutations you can use in the opening of your email:

  • Hello

  • Greetings

  • Good afternoon

  • Dear

Related: How to Write Salutations (With Salutation Examples)

3. Include a sentence about the position

After your greeting, start the email by providing information about the role and the interview, including the date and time. Hiring managers may interview multiple candidates regularly, especially if they receive many applications for a position. Providing this information allows you to refresh a hiring manager's memory so they can recall the details or search their records to review their interview notes. You can also mention a memorable moment you had that they may remember, such as connecting over a shared hobby or discovering you have a mutual business connection.

4. Ask a question

After reminding the hiring manager about your interview, you can ask them about the status of the position. Phrasing your interest in the role and the status of the hiring process as a question prompts a response from the reader. The hiring manager may feel more inclined to answer if you ask a question than if you phrase your interest as a statement. Here are some examples of questions you can ask to enquire about your application:

  • Have you hired a candidate for this position?

  • Do you have an estimated time for the final decision?

  • How is the hiring process advancing forward?

  • Am I still being considered for the position?

5. Show your interest in the role

After you ask about the status of the position, include a statement about your continued interest in this role. You can mention your enthusiasm for getting a job at the company, your desire to work with the hiring manager or your interest in the position. This tells the hiring manager you're passionate about the job, which can benefit the company if they choose to hire you. Here are some examples of statements you can use to emphasise your interest in the role:

  • I want to express my sincerest interest in joining the company.

  • I am excited about the thought of working for the company.

  • I'm still very interested in becoming a part of your team.

  • I want to reiterate my enthusiasm regarding the position.

6. Thank the hiring manager

After you ask a question and express your interest, remember to thank the hiring manager for their time. They're likely busy interviewing candidates and reviewing their qualifications. Expressing gratitude shows them you acknowledge they took the time to read your email and appreciate their consideration. You can also mention that you can provide references for them upon request and note that you look forward to hearing from them. This may encourage them to respond to you as soon as possible.

7. End with your full name and contact information

At the end of the email, include a professional closing and follow it with your full name and contact information. Including your phone number makes it easy for hiring managers to reach out to you if they have questions for you, want to update you on the status of the position or decide to offer you the job. Here are some examples of email closings you can consider using:

  • Best regards,

  • Thanks again,

  • Thank you for your time,

  • Sincerely,

  • Thanks and regards,

Related: Email Etiquette: How to End an Email (With Examples)

Tips for sending a second follow-up email

Here are some tips to consider before writing and sending a second follow-up email after a job interview:

Wait at least a week

It's important to wait at least a week before sending a second follow-up email so that you give the company sufficient time to interview more candidates and evaluate details from your interview. Emailing after the first week can give you extra time to craft a thoughtful email. The hiring manager may also have more time to read and respond to your email.

Keep it simple

Keeping a second follow-up email simple may help you receive quick responses from employers. In the email, try to include one to two questions that highlight the information you want. Include basic information about yourself, using only a few sentences to describe the position and interview. Writing a concise second follow-up email can help you make your point clear and respect the hiring manager's time.

Pay attention to the information provided by employers

Try your best to pay attention to any information the hiring manager gives you regarding follow-up communication. The employer may ask that their candidates don't reach out to them until they reach out first. A hiring manager typically mentions when you can expect a response from them, so avoid emailing before this time. For example, if they mention it may be a few weeks before contacting you, it's better to avoid sending a second follow-up email before those few weeks.

Proofread email

Proofread your email before sending it to the hiring manager to ensure it's free from grammatical errors and formatting issues. By sending an error-free email, you show the hiring manager you can reinforce your attention to detail. Have a trusted colleague read through your email before sending it to see if they can identify any issues. You can also consider reading it aloud to ensure it sounds professional.

Related: Email Etiquette: The Professional Business Email Format

Second follow-up email template

Here's a template you can use to send a second follow-up email to check on the status of the job:

Subject: [Subject line with brief relevant information]

Dear [hiring manager's name],

I recently interviewed for the position of [position title] on [date, time and location of interview]. It was great to meet with you to discuss the position. [Optional sentence about a memorable moment during the interview]. As I haven't heard from the company, I'm reaching out to see if you've filled the position. If not, do you have an estimated time for the final decision? I'm still very interested in becoming a part of your team. Please let me know if I can provide additional information, such as references. I look forward to hearing from you.

Thank you,

[Your full name]
[Phone number]

Second follow-up email example

Here's an example of a second follow-up email you can use as a reference when writing your own:

Subject: Enquiring about copywriter position

Dear Joshua Chan,

I recently interviewed for the position of copywriter on 2 April at 9 a.m. at your office in Central. It was great to meet with you to discuss the position. I especially enjoyed learning about your professional connection to my friend and mentor, Anna Li. Since I haven't received any feedback from the company, I'm reaching out to see if you've filled the position. If not, do you have an estimated time for the final decision? I'm still very interested in becoming a part of your team. Please let me know if I can provide additional information, such as references. I look forward to hearing from you.

Thank you,

Sarah Cheung
5895 5986

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